Numbers 106-107: Woodchuck Semi-Dry & Seattle Semi-Sweet

SemisThis sampling was all about testing. First off, I wanted to see if I could truly taste the difference between a semi-dry and a semi-sweet cider. Secondly, I wanted to try something different, as every other group review I have written thus far has been about ciders from the same cidery. Not only were these different varieties of ciders from different makers, but one was from a can and the other a bottle, and both originated from opposite ends of the country. I have a lot of ciders to get through, and there are a number of interesting ways to group them.SemiDry

I began the sampling with the Woodchuck Semi-Dry. This cider greets the nostrils with a wholesome aroma that often accompanies darker, more amber-colored ciders. The dryness certainly comes into play with the aftertaste, as it leaves a lingering bitter taste on the tongue, which almost amounts to a mustiness. The cider certainly lives up to its name, as it isn’t overpoweringly dry and there are definitely notes of sweetness present. That said, dry is certainly the impression that it leaves. Historically, Woodchuck ciders are almost always a home run for me. I suspect that this one would appeal to someone who cares for dry ciders, but I think it might be my least favorite of the cidery’s body of work.

SemiSweet

The next cider on the docket  was Seattle Cider’s Semi-Sweet. This was a much livelier cider, with an aroma of crisp green apple. The Semi-Sweet was also quite full-bodied, and carried a pleasing tang that bordered on sourness. This cider also featured a very balanced flavor, with the scales tipping only ever so slightly in favor of sweetness over dryness. The liveliness of this cider’s smooth finish and lack of bitter aftertaste made it the more appealing of the two. I have not sampled much of Seattle Cider’s body of work, so as a manufacturer, it’s hard to rank this against their other varieties. But, as a bare-bones cider, I certainly enjoyed this one.

One of my favorite quotes from Parks & Recreation comes from Ron Swanson, who advises “Never half-ass two things. Whole-ass one thing.” I understand that sweetness/dryness is a spectrum, but I feel that the Semi-Dry might have been stronger had it just been a full-on dry cider, rather than getting muddled in the mixture. Here, the Semi-Sweet excelled, executing the balance between sweet and dry almost perfectly.

The Ciderman’s Rating:

Semi-Dry: 5/10

Semi-Sweet: 7/10

Number 105: William Tell Bone Dry

In the woods near the house behind the house where I grew up, my brother and I found a bone. It wasn’t small like a rabbit or raccoon, nor was it thin like a deer. It was thicker around than my fist, and the end of it was buried deep enough in the ground that it needed to be dug up almost in its entirety. My brother and I were young, so this couldn’t be anything other than a dinosaur bone. However, after all the excitement, further analysis revealed it to be a cow femur. What child doesn’t get excited about a cow bone?William tell Bone Dry

As I have mentioned in my previous posts, I do not care for dry ciders, or really dryness in any beverage. And so, it always baffles me when ciders tout this as their strongest quality. William Tell’s Bone Dry is, as the name suggests, a very dry cider. It first strikes with an acerbic taste, but it finishes with a lingering dryness that coats the tongue and any part of the mouth it touches. Overall, this cider’s most forward quality is how dry it is, and unfortunately, that is not something that appeals to me as a cider drinker. With the ever-increasing number of ciders and cideries available, it’s hard to fathom how you couldn’t find a cider you enjoy. However, when it comes to my palate, I would much rather chase after dinosaurs than settle for the cow bone.

The Ciderman’s Rating: 4/10

Numbers 102-104: Keepsake Heartwood, Wood & Spirit, and Wild

This is a day I always knew would come. I have painstakingly curated my consumption of ciders, as well as the list that keeps record (in chronological order) of my exploits. However, what happens when I attend a festival or some kind of event in which I try a slew of new ciders? I suppose the answer is that I review them all at once. Fortunately for me, the event I attended was the soft opening for Keepsake Ciders’ tasting room, which kept all of the ciders I tried today within the same manufacture. I indulged in a beautiful trio of ciders, served on a hand-carved flight board, and here is the breakdown:

Keepsake Trio

Heartwood: Each of the ciders I sampled today was on the dry end of the spectrum, but the Heartwood truly embraced it. The cider was spritely and effervescent, with a tart flavor bordering on pleasantly acerbic. Of the three ciders I sampled, this one emerged as my clear favorite. I am never one to seek out a dry cider, but the Heartwood was inventive and enjoyable enough that it kept me engaged throughout the entire beverage.

Wood & Spirit: The Wood & Spirit was aged in oak whiskey barrels. Unlike several ciders I’ve had previously that have also employed this method, this was very apparent in the flavor. The dryness of the Wood & Spirit was very forward, and the aroma was much woodier than the Heartwood.

Wild: This was certainly a unique one. The Wild cider was fermented using the yeast that was native to the peel of the apples, and this certainly came through in the flavor. The Wild bore a very full body, and a lovely apple-forward taste. The aroma here was very inviting, and made for a polished overall presentation.

I had the opportunity to talk with Nathan, the cider maker at Keepsake, and was delighted to hear about his passion for working with other local orchards, as well as collaborating with other cideries to establish Minnesota as a state with a cider identity. Keepsake is a family-owned cidery, and a great addition to the high level of craftsmanship in Minnesota cider-making, and a fantastic place to spend a lazy Saturday afternoon.

The Ciderman’s Rating:

Heartwood: 9.5/10

Wood & Spirit: 8.5/10

Wild: 8/10

Number 101: Angry Orchard Easy Apple

One of the things that I keep under strict organization is my iTunes library. Call me old-fashioned, but there is a certain sense of security in owning my music and having the physical files stored on my computer. In organizing the songs, I have stumbled across the genre “easy listening.” What the hell does that mean? What is difficult listening? I can’t imagine popping my earbuds in, pressing play, and thinking “wow, this song is so easy to listen to!”unnamed

Angry Orchard’s Easy Apple was, in fact, very easy to drink. The Easy Apple is an unfiltered cider, which gives it a much fuller, richer flavor than the run-of-the-mill Crisp Apple. Not only that, but it also lacks what is often a sickly sweetness. Other than the initially misleading name, I think that the Easy Apple is a much more genuine-tasting cider than the mass-distributed Crisp Apple, and a much stronger product overall.

I’m very glad that a company as large and successful as Angry Orchard isn’t afraid to change things up or keep trying new things. Unfiltered ciders are, in my experience, some of the richest cider experiences, and Angry Orchard’s edition is a clear cut above many of their varieties.

The Ciderman’s Rating: 8/10

Number 99: Angry Orchard Tapped Maple

The summer of 2016 was a summer that my fiancée and I will always remember as a deluge of matrimony. Collectively, she and I attended six weddings within a four month period. Though they are some of the happiest days of the newlywed’s life, weddings can unfortunately be a reminder that not everyone is given the gift of public address. And when following a particularly adroit toast, an underwhelming speech can leave you feeling like more could have been done. Obviously in the long run, it’s not something that matters. The wedding is still an enjoyable celebration (unless there are six of them in four months and you run out of joy), and a lackluster speech doesn’t have to leave a lasting impression.Angry orchard tapped maple

The latest in their seasonal series, Angry Orchard’s Tapped Maple is exactly what it sounds like: a maple-flavored cider. Maple is one of those flavors that very easily evokes sense memories, such as the warmth and smell of a waffle fresh out of the iron. Unfortunately, the sense memory that this maple cider evoked was that of the watered down maple syrup served with french toast sticks at school lunches. Sure, it tasted like maple syrup, but once you’ve had the good stuff there’s really no going back. The maple flavor was present in the cider, but the taste only made me feel like they could have done more with it.

On the whole, I found this cider to be underwhelming. The aroma was middling. The balance was definitely apple-forward with a weak backup of maple notes. The sweetness wasn’t over the top, but did linger a bit, as you can imagine would be the case with this flavor profile. I had high hopes for a maple cider, but I was left feeling unfulfilled.

The Ciderman’s Rating: 4/10

Number 98: Sociable Burn Out

Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 debuted in theaters recently, and it was quite the hoot. With action, adventure, comedy, and some great cameos, it’s no surprise that it has quickly climbed to the number one spot in the box office. But what’s more, with its comedic timing, one-liners, and the ability of any one of the characters to crack a joke at any given moment, this movie epitomized the thought that has been in the back of movie-goers’ minds for years now: Marvel movies can get away with anything. Sociable Burnout
The cider notebook I’ve been using to record my recent samplings has a category to denote spice. I couldn’t imagine what a cider that maxed out that category would taste like, but now I have a pretty clear idea. The Sociable Burn Out is what I would classify as a “sipping cider,” not because of the high alcohol content, but because it is spicy as hell. I enjoy a good spicy beverage like a Bloody Mary every now and again, but it certainly threw me for a loop coming from a drink that I didn’t directly observe hot sauce being added to.
This cider is truly a wild ride. From the strong cucumber aroma to the sharp habanero flavor that shoots up the back of your nostrils, the Burn Out is a test for almost all of the senses. Once it comes into focus, the apples balance with the peppers rather nicely, resulting in a cider unlike any other. Of all the added flavors for ciders, I certainly would never have thought to put cucumber and habanero with apple, but somehow Sociable totally got away with it.
The Ciderman’s Rating: 9/10

Number 95 & 96: Sapsucker Farms Yellow Belly Barrel Aged & Ginger

The thing about birds is that they often flock together. Since Sapsucker Farms has only three different varieties, all of which are available Yellow Belly Barrel Agedat my local store, I felt compelled to sample the whole lot.

I began with the Barrel-Aged Yellow Belly, knowing that my preference for ginger would color my view of this cider. I have to say, I found this one rather uninteresting. It might be my palate, but I didn’t find much that separated this cider from the Semi-Sweet variety that I initially tried. Not only that, but I couldn’t taste anything barrel-aged at all. It was a fine cider, but there wasn’t really anything that made it stand out for me. I also found the presentation and color to be lacking. I’d think that a barrel-aged cider would grow dark and amber-colored, but this was one of the clearest ciders I’ve had in recent memory.

Yellow Belly GingerDays later, I moved on to the Ginger Yellow Belly. This one, I feel, is Sapsucker Farms’ strongest showing. I found it to have an excellent balance between ginger and apple flavor, if favoring the ginger slightly. This cider featured a spritely aroma and a very smooth finish. The Ginger was a cider that was exciting, yet very sessionable. This is not always the case with ginger ciders, as the flavor can grow tiresome on the palate.

Overall, I found the ginger to be the most enjoyable variety that Sapsucker Farms has to offer. I’m very happy that more and more cideries are cropping up in my area, even if it means more work for me. Minnesota, keep them coming!

The Ciderman’s Ratings:

Barrel Aged: 6/10

Ginger: 9/10

Number 94: Sapsucker Farms Yellow Belly

All of the blog posts wherein I take a moment to talk about my feelings and deepest-seated views on various alcohols have one thing in common: they are all about liquids. In this particular post, I am going to describe my view on something that I am surprised hasn’t come up before: birds. Although I find their forms majestic, their behavior and overall noise output have caused me to form this solid and unmoving opinion:yellowbelly-sapsucker

I hate birds. The are obnoxious, hollow-boned demons that poop everywhere, have no respect for circadian rhythms, and have no teeth.

Like a songbird’s cry piercing through my REM cycle, Sapsucker Farms’ Yellow Belly is lively and awakening. Quite possibly the most effervescent cider I’ve tried to date, a great portion of the Yellow Belly’s tasting comes from the sharp, acidic punch it delivers on the initial tasting. After that, the flavor smooths out into a lovely, semi-sweet taste.

When I first tried the Yellow Belly, little did I know, the temperature was much too cold. This flattened the flavor into something far less vibrant than its potential. After reading the cider’s reviews on their website, I had to go out to the liquor store to pick up another bottle to try this award-winning cider again. It’s not something I do often, but when I’m feeling nonplussed about a supposedly great cider, I try to figure out why that is. And I am very glad that I did.

The Ciderman’s Rating: 8.5/10

Number 93: Wyder’s Prickly Pineapple

I’m always eager to try new things, but occasionally, they can feel a little too far into uncharted territory. A friend recently recommended that the next time I make scrambled eggs to mix in some cottage cheese. As a rule, cottage cheese is something that repulses me. The smell, the semisolid texture, and I do not get along. However, I told him I would try it, and I’m a man of my word. As it turns out, it’s a pretty tasty combo.

wyders-prickly-pineappleCottage cheese and scrambled eggs are not a perfect analogy for pineapple and apple. Unlike cottage cheese, I am never one to turn down pineapple-flavored anything. I was hesitant, however, to procure a full 6-pack of Wyder’s Prickly Pineapple because I was not convinced that pineapple and apple could be blended in a way that wasn’t overpowering toward one flavor or the other.

I was wrong.

The pineapple is eager to jump out in front as the most prominent flavor, but once the cider settles into the palate, the apple comes out to reveal the careful balance between the two very different fruits. The aroma is far more tropical than most ciders, giving it a zesty, fresh quality. The cider is a little on the sweet side, but the balance and overall presentation makes this much more forgivable than for an average cider.

This is the first pineapple cider I’ve tried, and I have an Ace pineapple cider already lined up in the queue for the future, so I will be excited to compare the two.

The Ciderman’s Rating: 8/10

Number 92: Schilling Ascender

As a child, I did not understand the concept of the lazy river. Why, in a place filled with water slides and wave pools, would you ever want to just sit in an inner tube and do nothing? At a water park, the thrill-seeker in me wanted all the excitement and verticality that the lazy river was perfectly inept to offer.schilling-ascender

Going in to the Schilling Ascender, I had a number of expectations. The imagery on the can led me to believe that this was going to be a fairly carbonated cider with a crisp apple base and a clear ginger flavor that felt as invigorating as cold mountain air. What I found after pouring the cider from the can was considerably different.

In place of the bevy of bubbles I had expected, the cider was clouded with ginger particles floating lazily about. The flavor itself was yeastier than I imagined it would be, and the ginger, while present, was far less crisp than other ginger ciders on my list.

The aroma was pleasant, and the overall cider was an enjoyable albeit unexpected beverage. I definitely wouldn’t have marketed it with such an air of adventure. It was good in the way a lazy river is good, but definitely not in the same way as a water slide.

The Ciderman’s Rating: 5/10